Bean’s Station, Tenn; December 15, 1863

Bean’s Station, Tenn.
Dec. 15TH, 1863

Bean’s Station, Tenn., Dec. 15, 1863.

Shackelford’s Cavalry. Gen. Shackelford’s command engaged Lieut.-Gen.
Longstreet’s “Troops in East Tennessee.” On the 12th it had
been reported to Longstreet that Federal reinforcements at
Bean’s station had returned to Chattanooga, whence they had
come, and that the force at the station consisted of 3 cavalry
brigades and 1 brigade of infantry, the main body of
Shackelford’s command being between Rutledge and Blain’s
crossroads. Longstreet planned a surprise for the Federals
for the 14th. His main force was to move from Rogersville
directly down to Bean’s station with the hope of capturing the
forces there, Gen. Martin with 4 cavalry brigades, was to go
down the south side of the Holston and Cross the river at or
below the Station, While Gen. Jones with 2 cavalry brigades,
was to go down on the north side of Clinch mountain to cut off
the Federal retreat at Bean’s station Gap. Heavy Rains Day
and night on the 13th made marching slow. The timely arrival
of the Confederate infantry column surprised the Federals
completely. Jones arrived on time and captured several
Federal wagons. Then, not understanding orders to cooperate
with other troops, he withdrew from the gap. Not until nearly
night was Martin Able to Cross A Part of his command and that
he soon withdrew. Federals stood their ground against an
attack by infantry and artillery but before an onslaught by
Buckner’s division, they fell back to buildings at Bean’s
station, where they made a determined stand. Next morning
they were in A New position 3 Miles Below the station
protected by rail defenses. During the Day there was much
planning and demonstrating, but little fighting. A little
after nightfall the Federal forces retreated Toward Rutledge
and the enemy occupied the defenses. At Blain’s Cross-Roads
they made a successful stand against Armstrong’s Confederate
cavalry.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 5

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s